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The effects of drug and behavior therapy on urgency and voiding frequency.

Author(s): Burgio KL, Kraus SR, Borello-France D, Chai TC, Kenton K, Goode PS, Xu Y, Kusek JW, Urinary Incontinence Treatment Network

Affiliation(s): Department of Veterans Affairs, Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, 11G 700 South 19th Street, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA. kburgio@uab.edu

Publication date & source: 2010-06, Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct., 21(6):711-9. Epub 2010 Feb 9.

Publication type: Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The objective of this study was to examine the effects of drug therapy alone and combined with behavioral therapy on urgency and 24-voiding frequency in women with urge-predominant incontinence and to identify predictors of change. METHODS: A planned analysis of data from a multi-site, randomized, controlled trial (N = 307). Bladder diaries were used to document voids, incontinence, and urgency severity. RESULTS: Urgency scores decreased significantly within both treatment groups, but changes did not differ between groups (p = 0.30). Improvement in urgency was associated with greater baseline urgency (p < 0.0001) and black ethnicity (p = 0.03). Voiding frequency increased with drug alone and decreased slightly with combined therapy (p = 0.009), and improvement was associated with combined treatment (p < 0.0001), higher baseline frequency (p < 0.0001), and lower baseline incontinence episode frequency (p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Although combined drug and behavioral therapy does not appear to improve urgency more than drug alone, it resulted in better outcomes on voiding frequency.

Page last updated: 2010-10-05

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