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Risk factors for arthralgias or myalgias associated with quinupristin-dalfopristin therapy.

Author(s): Carver PL, Whang E, VandenBussche HL, Kauffman CA, Malani PN

Affiliation(s): College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109-1065, USA. peg@umich.edu

Publication date & source: 2003-02, Pharmacotherapy., 23(2):159-64.

STUDY OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risk factors for the development of arthralgias or myalgias associated with quinupristin-dalfopristin. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review and case-control analysis. SETTING: An 850-bed tertiary care medical center. PATIENTS: All adult and pediatric patients who had received quinupristin-dalfopristin through either a compassionate-use protocol (February 1996-October 1999) or in the year after quinupristin-dalfopristin was added to the hospital formulary (November 1999-October 2000) were included in this study. Case patients were those who developed arthralgias or myalgias while receiving quinupristin-dalfopristin therapy; control patients were those who received quinupristin-dalfopristin but did not develop arthralgias or myalgias. INTERVENTION: Medical records, pharmacy dispensing information, and microbiology data were reviewed by a physician and a pharmacist, both of whom specialized in infectious diseases. Presence or absence of arthralgias or myalgias was the primary outcome assessed. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Quinupristin-dalfopristin was administered to 68 patients during the period defined by the study. Arthralgias and myalgias could not be assessed in 18 of the 68 patients because they were sedated and paralyzed, or they were young children who could not communicate the presence of pain. Univariate analysis demonstrated that significant risk factors for arthralgias or myalgias associated with quinupristin-dalfopristin were female sex, chronic liver disease, receipt of liver transplant, elevated bilirubin level at baseline, major surgery, and receipt of either mycophenolate or cyclosporine. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a strong association with chronic liver disease, receipt of liver transplant, elevated bilirubin level at baseline, and receipt of either cyclosporine or mycophenolate. Of 50 evaluable patients receiving quinupristin-dalfopristin, 25 had pain that may have been associated with this antimicrobial agent. CONCLUSION: The mechanism for development of arthralgias or myalgias associated with quinupristin-dalfopristin remains unknown, but these adverse events are more likely to occur in patients with chronic liver disease and those who have received a liver transplant or are receiving cyclosporine or mycophenolate.

Page last updated: 2006-01-31

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