DrugLib.com — Drug Information Portal

Rx drug information, pharmaceutical research, clinical trials, news, and more



The effects of a nucleotide supplement on the immune and metabolic response to short term, high intensity exercise performance in trained male subjects.

Author(s): Mc Naughton L, Bentley D, Koeppel P

Affiliation(s): Department of Sport Science, University of Hull, Hull, UK. l.mcnaughton@hull.ac.uk

Publication date & source: 2007-03, J Sports Med Phys Fitness., 47(1):112-8.

Publication type: Randomized Controlled Trial

AIM: The aim of this work was to determine the ergogenic effects of a nucleotide supplement on the metabolic and immune responses to short term high intensity exercise in volunteer, trained, male subjects. METHODS: Thirty moderately trained male subjects were randomly divided into 3 equal sized groups, control (C), placebo (P) or experimental (E). Each subject undertook a 2 min maximal exercise test prior to, and after 60 days, on either a nucleotide (E) or placebo supplement. Prior to exercise testing unstimulated saliva samples and blood samples were taken. Saliva was analysed for cortisol and IgA, while blood was analysed for lactate, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. RESULTS: The postexercise C value was significantly higher than the pre-exercise concentration (P<0.0001; for C, P, and E). In the postsupplement C analysis, the E postexercise group was significantly lower than either the C (P<0.005) or the P group (P<0.05). In the pre- and postsupplementation periods, the pre-exercise SIgA values were significantly higher than the postexercise values (P<0.0001). However, in the postsupplementation period, the SIgA value in the E group was significantly higher than either the P (P<0.05) or C (P<0.05) groups. There were no significant changes in blood lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, or creatine kinase concentrations post supplementation. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that a chronically ingested nucleotide supplement blunts the response of the hormones associated with physiological stress.

Page last updated: 2007-08-04

-- advertisement -- The American Red Cross
 
Home | About Us | Contact Us | Site usage policy | Privacy policy

All Rights reserved - Copyright DrugLib.com, 2006-2017