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Chorionic Gonadotropin (Chorionic Gonadotropin (Human)) - Description and Clinical Pharmacology

 
 



DESCRIPTION

Human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), a polypeptide hormone produced by the human placenta, is composed of an alpha and a beta sub-unit. The alpha sub-unit is essentially identical to the alpha sub-units of the human pituitary gonadotropins, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), as well as to the alpha sub-unit of human thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH).  The beta sub-units of these hormones differ in amino acid sequence.  Chorionic gonadotropin is obtained from the human pregnancy urine. It is standardized by a biological assay procedure.

Chorionic Gonadotropin for Injection, USP is available in multiple dose vials containing 10,000 USP Units with accompanying Bacteriostatic Water for Injection for reconstitution.  When reconstituted with 10 mL of the accompanying diluent each vial contains:

Chorionic gonadotropin                         10,000 Units

Mannitol                                                 100 mg

Benzyl alcohol                                        0.9%

Water for Injection                                  q.s.

Buffered with dibasic sodium phosphate and monobasic sodium phosphate. Hydrochloric acid and/or sodium hydroxide may have been used for pH adjustment (6.0-8.0).  Nitrogen gas is used in the freeze drying process.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

The action of HCG is virtually identical to that of pituitary LH, although HCG appears to have a small degree of FSH activity as well.  It stimulates production of gonadal steroid hormones by stimulating the interstitial cells (Leydig cells) of the testis to produce androgens and the corpus luteum of the ovary to produce progesterone.  Androgen stimulation in the male leads to the development of secondary sex characteristics and may stimulate testicular descent when no anatomical impediment to descent is present. This descent is usually reversible when HCG is discontinued. During the normal menstrual cycle, LH participates with FSH in the development and maturation of the normal ovarian follicle, and the mid-cycle LH surge triggers ovulation. HCG can substitute for LH in this function.  During a normal pregnancy, HCG secreted by the placenta maintains the corpus luteum after LH secretion decreases, supporting continued secretion of estrogen and progesterone and preventing menstruation.  HCG HAS NO KNOWN EFFECT ON FAT MOBILIZATION, APPETITE OR SENSE OF HUNGER, OR BODY FAT DISTRIBUTION.

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